Christopher Martell is a psychologist and depression researcher in Seattle, Washington. Dr. Martell writes, consults and speaks internationally about Behavioral Activation Therapy and maintains a private psychotherapy practice in Seattle, Washington.

In his private practice, Dr. Martell is dedicated to applying empirically supported treatments for couples and individuals. Along with being an authority on Behavioral Activation, Cognitive-Behavior Therapy, and Behavioral Marital Therapy, Dr. Martell has in depth experience researching and helping lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients coping with depression, anxiety, relationship conflicts or other life problems.

You can find information about several of Dr. Martell's books on this site, including:

Now in Paperback!
The Myth of Depression as Disease
 
Christopher Martell

Christopher Martell prepares for a talk on CBT with lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients at the University of Uppsala, Sweden, where he also conducted a two-day lecture on behavioral treatment of depression.

Upcoming events/presentations

Workshops and Training Events for 2013:

Dr. Martell has moved from Seattle to continue research consulting, teaching and writing projects.  He closed his private practice as of June, 2012. Information for former clients regarding requests for records can be found under the "Professional Services" tab on this website.   

Dr. Martell will be one of many Keynote speakers at the World Congress of Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies conference in Lima, Peru in July. He will speak on "World Wide Variations in the Treatment of Sexual Minorities: Implications for CBT" on Weds. July 24, 2013.

 

While there are not currently trainings in BA planned, therapists have a unique opportunity to participate in a review of web-based training with clients through Behavioral Tech Research, Inc. (BTECH-R).  Information regarding this opportunity can be found on their website at: http://www.btechresearch.com/#!depression-treatment-study/cqn2, and interested clinicians can complete a brief eligibility screening online at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/WVWYVNG or can call at (206) 957-1044 or email info@btechresearch.com.  NOTE that Dr. Martell is not an employee of BTECH-R and is not available for contact through these numbers or email addresses.

Recent presentations

In June, 2013, Dr. Martell conducted a one-day training on Behavioral Activation in Vancouver, B.C. sponsored by the Vancouver CBT Centre. He also conducted a BA workshop in Stockholm, SE in April and in March, 2013, Dr. Martell conducted a Train the Trainers, behavioral activation master clinician workshop for NHS Scotland at "A House for Art Lovers" in Glasgow, Scotland.

Dr. Martell conducted Workshops on "Behavioural Activation for Depression: An Overview for the non-Behavourist and Others" at the Oxford Cognitive Therapy Centre, in Oxford, U.K.  on the 19th and 20th of March, 2012.

 

What is Behavioral Activation Therapy?

Dimidjian, S., Hollon, S.D., Dobson, K.S., Schmaling, K.B., Kohlenberg, R., Addis, M., Gallop, R., McGlinchey, J., Markley, D., Gollan, J.K., Atkins, D.C., Dunner, D.L., & Jacobson, N.S. (2006). Randomized trial of behavioral activation, cognitive therapy, and antidepressant medication in the acute treatment of adults with major depression. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 74 (4), 658-670.

A 2006 issue of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology published the results of a remarkable clinical trial that showed that Behavioral Activation performed as well as a standard Cognitive-Behavior Therapy protocol. With these results, people want to know more about BA.

In 1996 the late Neil S. Jacobson and colleagues compared BA and cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression. While cognitive therapy was a much more complex treatment, the researchers found no significant differences in benefits between the treatments. Following that study Jacobson and colleagues launched the largest ever single site depression treatment study: they compared BA, Cognitive Therapy, and Antidepressant medications. The results: BA outperformed cognitive therapy in the acute treatment phase for moderately to severely depressed adults, and performed as well as antidepressant medication

To read more about BA and related topics please visit the behavioral activation page.

 

Logon